Monthly Archives: April 2019

THE 7TH KALAYAAN-LA 2019, FEATURES RUBY IBARRA

For Immediate Release
KALAYAAN LA 2019
April 16, 2019

THE 7TH KALAYAAN-LA 2019, FEATURES RUBY IBARRA

LOS ANGELES – MABUHAY ANG IKA-121 TAON NG ARAW NG KALAYAAN!

The 7TH KALAYAAN 2019 Independence Day Festival Committe, The LEVITT Foundation and District 1 City Council OFfice of Gil Cedillo announced today that the 7th KALAYAAN Parade will be held on June 8, 2019 from Mariposa St to MacArthur Park instead of the Historic FIlipinotown.

The HFT KALAYAAN Parade used to be held at Historic Filipinotown along the Beverly-Tempke Corridor for the past 6 years from 2013, But now it will go mainstram along Wilshire Blvd. in District 1 at Central LA at Westlake District.

7th KALAYAAN Parade, June 8, 2019

The 7th KALAYAAN LA PArade will start at MAriposa and Wishire St. at tthe PH Consulate General in LA to MacArthur PArk, PArk View and 7th Streets on June 8, 2019 starting at 11i;00 AM.

Assembly time is at 10 AM. Assembly are is at Msriposa St between Wilshire and 6th Strret.The parade start at 11 Am. Its first come first served basis.

For the parade participation,assembly area and time please contact the Parade Coordinator Art P. GArcia at (213)318-9065 or email at jfavusa8@gmail,com. Also visit our website at www.jfavusa.org

The 7TH KALAYAAN-LA 2019 Festival

Meanwhile The 7th KALAYAAN 2019 Independence Day Festival will feature Rap Artist RUBY IBARRA and Kulintang Artis GINGEEon June 8 , 2019 at PArkview St, MacArthur Park.

There will be entertainment, cultural shows, fashion show, youth workshops and spoken word , singing contest , battle of the bands, foods and a lot fun.

Join us at the 7thKALAYAAN FEstival from 12 noon up to 9 pm on SAturday and from 1o AM to 7 PM on SUnday.

For the festival booths and entertaiment opportunities as well as
the souvenir program please call the Festival Coordinaitor Freddie at (818)-350-9609 or email at famecorp888@gmail.com

7th Kalayaan 2019 Contacts

For other matters , ads and sponsorship opportunities please \contact the over-all coordinator Thelma Sugay at (747)-221-2322 or email at thelma@jmasgroup@gmail.com

For BINIBINING KALAYAAN-LA 2019 Pageant applications and requeirment and canvasssing schedules please contact Jojo at ( 213)-318-5104 or Art at (213) 318-9065 or email at jfavusa8@gmail.com

END

####

Bataan and Doolittle

 

REVEILLE
/ 09:05 AM April 15, 2019

For the first time in over 50 years of remembering Bataan in rituals at Mount Samat, the highest national official in attendance, Interior Secretary Eduardo Año, representing President Duterte, paid tribute to the 350-400 officers and men of the 91st Philippine Army Division who were executed by their Japanese captors after they surrendered. Año was accompanied by Japanese Ambassador Koji Haneda and US Deputy Chief of Mission John Law.

For so many years, this terrible tragedy that took place just two days after US Gen. Edward King gave up his Filipino-American force to Gen. Masaharu Homma, was ignored as attention focused on the Death March.

The massacre saw Japanese officers using sabers to behead their captives, while enlisted men disposed of the others with their bayonets. For the prisoners, tied up with telephone wires, the Geneva Convention was just a sheet of paper.

In his remarks at Mount Samat last Tuesday, Año recalled the sad fate of the officers and men of the 91st Philippine Army Division and asked for prayers in special remembrance of the unfortunate victims

Doolitle Raid

Just as the Pantingan River execution and the Death March were taking place, a top secret project designed to boost American morale after the disaster at Pearl Harbor and the loss of American air power in the Philippines, was in its final stage of implementation.

In his best-selling book “Target Tokyo,” author James M. Scott who recently gave us “Rampage: MacArthur, Yamashita, and the Battle of Manila,” narrates how 16 army bombers flown by 80 volunteers specially trained in aircraft carrier takeoffs, carried out an almost impossible, daring raid that sought to avenge the disaster in Hawaii.

Just two weeks after Pearl Harbor, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt convened his military advisers in his study. He understood that the continued defeats suffered by both the United States and the United Kingdom were demoralizing the American public. He was resolute in finding a way of carrying the war to the Japanese homeland in the form of a bombing mission.

The man chosen to oversee the whole project was a former boxer turned aviator, Jimmy Doolittle. After a quick study of aircraft available for the mission, he chose the B-25 Mitchell bomber named after aviation pioneer Gen. William “Billy” Mitchell. It was chosen for one reason—its 67-foot wingspan could clear the superstructure of an aircraft carrier.

It also required only five crew members: a pilot, co-pilot, navigator, bombardier and gunner. The next problem was the issue of air crew. Doolittle wanted only volunteers for the mission. With about 150 officers and men selected, intensive training in carrier takeoffs using mockups of the B-25 bomber began.

By April 2, 16 B-25 bombers with 80 crew members were onboard the aircraft carrier Hornet, sailing out of San Francisco Bay, along with escort vessels. Except for Doolittle, none of the crew members knew their final destination. A day later, on April 3, Homma launched his final Good Friday offensive against Fil-Am forces.

On April 9, Bataan surrendered. The Hornet was a week out of San Francisco as the Death March began. Two days later the Pantingan River massacre took place. On April 13, an announcement was broadcast to the men of Task Force Mike accompanying the Hornet: “This force is bound for Tokyo. For the first time in the history of Japan, the home territory is about to be attacked.”

The Bombing Of Tokyo

 

In the early hours of April 18, 1942, Col. Jimmy Doolittle with his copilot Richard Cole led the flight of 16 B-25 bombers headed for Tokyo. The raiders hit targets mainly in Tokyo, Osaka and Nagoya. While the damage done was minimal, the United States had struck its first blow against Japan causing tremendous loss of face for the Japanese Imperial General Staff.

Of the 80 men who participated in the attack, 61 survived the war. Doolittle himself would live until age 96, a Medal of Honor winner for his leadership and courage in the planning and successful execution of the mission.

The first reunion of the survivors was held on Dec. 15, 1945, a tradition that would continue for several decades. In 2013, with only four raiders remaining, they decided to hold their last and final toast.

The sole survivor of the group, Lt. Col. Richard Cole, the copilot of Doolittle in the Tokyo raid, died last week, on Tuesday, April 9 (Bataan Day), at the age of 103. Even in death, Bataan was part of their story. Next Thursday, April 18, marks the 77th anniversary of what was once considered as “Mission Impossible.”

While there is no correlation between the events that took place in Bataan and the attack on Tokyo by Doolittle’s raiders, it is interesting to note what actions were being undertaken by the United States to further the war effort, just as Filipino and American prisoners of war were being marched off to concentration camps after surrender.

It is also possible that one of the consequences of the Tokyo raid was added harshness and cruelty by Japanese troops on their prisoners upon receipt of news that the homeland had been attacked.

rjfarolan56@gmail.com

END

###

 

 

RITES HELD FOR VETERANS

JFAV UPDATES

April 14, 2019

RITES HELD FOR VETERANS

SAN BRUNO, California — “I won’t forget the sufferings I experienced under the Japanese –hunger and other sufferings, as if I am again suffering when I remember those days,” 96-year-old David Tejada said in Tagalog. 

Tejada is a Bataan Death March survivor of the 12th Signal Co., Philippine Scouts. He recalled his Death March experience as he attended the joint 77th Anniversary of  the Bataan Death March and 75th Anniversary of the Battle of Leyte Gulf at the Golden Gate National Cemetery in San Bruno, California last weekend

Probably one of the only few Bataan Death March survivors still living, Tejada is one of two or three veterans in the Bay Area who were in the 65-mile march from Bagac, Bataan to Camp O’Donnell in Capas, Tarlac.

Tejada was released conditionally but was later picked up by the Japanvand forced to drive a truck in a Japanese-held mining area until the liberation. He later rejoined the Philippine Scouts under the US Army.

Honored with Tejada were other WWII survivors: Alfonso Al Lamata, a San Francisco native who was 17-years-old when he was first assigned to Company D of the 2nd Filipino Infantry Battalion; Mickey Ganitch, now 99 years old and was in the USS Pennsylvania when Pearl Harbor was bombed on Dec. 7, 1941; Johnny Johnson Johngordon who was with the USS San Francisco, one of the most decorated ships with 17 battle stars.

Filipino Major General (ret,) Eldon Regua USA Army Reserve, the event’s master of ceremony, estimated that of about 260,000 Filipino soldiers who served in WWII from 1941-46, some 13,000 are still living and serving examples to the estimated 60 junior cadets from local schools who attended the ceremony.

Keynote speaker Vice Admiral Linda Fagan, U.S. Coast Guard Commander of the Pacific Area, poignantly recalled that 75,000 Filipino and American troops in Bataan were surrendered to Japanese Army on April 9, 1942: “Over 1,600 Americans and about 16,000 Filipinos died of malnutrition, dysentery, and malaria. Leyte was the last major fleet engagement and it was in this battle that Japan’s final naval force was paralyzed in this Battle of Leyte Gulf.”

Fagan added that everyone should study the past as it is so important for “a better understanding of who we are as a nation, our common interests and our fellow humanity as we shape our shared futures together.”

Bataan Legacy Historical Society executive director Cecilia Gaerlan reported in her speech that the implementation of the California Department of Education-approved 11th grade public school curriculum framework for the inclusion of World War II in the Philippines has yet to take place in the 66 high school districts and over 1,600 high schools in California.

“In the Bay Area there are some 15 schools in San Jose, Jefferson School District in Daly City, San Francisco Unified, Union city, San Leandro, among others have implemented the teaching of WWII in the Philippines,” Gaerlan said. “This is just the beginning as 90 percent of the work remains to be done. We want this to be implemented throughout the country. It is after all a seminal part of U.S. history.”

Gaerlan is optimistic though that things will move smoothly after the textbooks formally come out and distributed nationally incorporating the changes reflecting the inclusion in the California curriculum framework.

ADVERTISEMENT

Meanwhile, in another commemoration of the Bataan Death March in San Francisco by Justice for Filipino American WWII Veterans (JFAV), war veteran Porfirio Robea exhorted everyone to “Defend Bataan and the West Philippine Sea.“

“I fought for Bataan and liberated the country from the enemies. It’s because of the supreme sacrifice of veterans like my fallen comrades and me why you have a country that’s rich in natural resources. Do not simply concede to China. The national territory in its totality is for our people and the future of our children. It’s a source of economic sustenance, security and pride for our people,” declared Robea.

“If you do not love and protect what you own, who else would? I will not live for so long but the memory and legacy of Bataan shall forever stay in history to remind you that there were people who refused to surrender— that there were people who chose freedom and bravely paid for it with our sacrifice without any regrets!” Robea said further.

END

###

Bataan has Fallen Be Not Afraid

JFAV UPDATES

April 13, 2019

BATAAN HAS FALLEN. BE NOT AFRAID

Speech by Captain Salvador P. Lopez, delivered by Lieutenant Normando Ildefonso Reyes on the Voice of Freedom broadcast at Malinta Tunnel, Corregidor Island on April 9, 1942.

Bataan has fallen. The Philippine-American troops on this war-ravaged and bloodstained peninsula have laid down their arms. With heads bloody but unbowed, they have yielded to the superior force and numbers of the enemy.

The world will long remember the epic struggle that Filipino and American soldiers put up in the jungle fastness and along the rugged coast of Bataan. They have stood up uncomplaining under the constant and grueling fire of the enemy for more that three months. Besieged on land and blockaded by sea, cut off from all sources of help in the Philippines and in America, the intrepid fighters have done all that human endurance could bear.

For what sustained them through all these months of incessant battle was a force that was more than merely physical. It was the force of an unconquerable faith – something in the heart and soul that physical hardship and adversity could not destroy! It was the thought of native land and all that it holds most dear, the thought of freedom and dignity and pride in these most priceless of all our human prerogatives.

The adversary, in the pride of his power and triumph, will credit our troops with nothing less than the courage and fortitude that his own troops have shown in battle. Our men have fought a brave and bitterly contested struggle. All the world will testify to the most superhuman endurance with which they stood up until the last in the face of overwhelming odds.

But the decision had to come. Men fighting under the banner of unshakable faith are made of something more that flesh, but they are not made of impervious steel. The flesh must yield at last, endurance melts away, and the end of the battle must come.

Surrender Site in Balanga Elementary School in Balanga, BataanBataan has fallen, but the spirit that made it stand – a beacon to all the liberty-loving peoples of the world – cannot fall!

All of us know the story of Easter Sunday. It was the triumph of light over darkness, life over death. It was the vindication of a seemingly unreasonable faith. It was the glorious resurrection of a leader, only three days before defeated and executed like a common felon.

Today, on the commemoration of that Resurrection, we can humbly and without presumption declare our faith and hope in our own resurrection, our own inevitable victory.

We, too, were betrayed by Judases. We were taken in the night by force of arms, and though we had done wrong to no man, our people were bound and delivered into the hands of our enemies. We have been with mock symbols of sovereignty, denied by weaklings, lashed with repeated oppression, tortured and starved. We have been given gall to drink, and we have shed our blood.

To those who look upon us from afar it must seem the Filipino people have descended into hell, into the valley of death. But we know that the patient and watching men who said their simple prayers in the hills of Bataan, have not lost faith, and we know that the hushed congregations in the churches throughout the land, drew from the gospel as Mass renewed hope in their resurrection. To all of them we give today the message of the angel of Easter morning: “Be not afraid, for He is risen.”

We, too, shall rise. After we have paid the full price of our redemption, we shall return to show the scars of sacrifices that all may touch and believe. When the trumpets sound the hour we shall roll aside the stone before the tomb and the tyrant guards shall scatter in confusion.

No wall of stone shall then be strong enough to contain us, no human force shall suffice to hold us in subjection, we shall rise in the name of freedom and the East shall be alight with the glory of our liberation.

Until then, people of the Philippines, Be not afraid

END

###

 

DAY OF VALOR MARKED IN US CAPITOL

JFAV UPDATES

April 13, 2019

‘Day of Valor’ in the nation’s capital honors Bataan and Corregidor Heroes

Washington, D.C. April 9, 2019. “I can think of no other place I would rather be today than at this ceremony, remembering with you the courage and sacrifice, the resilience and the strength of the Defenders of Corregidor and Bataan.”


U.S. Army Lt. Gen. David H. Huntoon (Ret)

U.S. Army Lt. Gen. David H. Huntoon (Ret) said those words today at the National World War II Memorial where community leaders, diplomats, families and veterans advocates gathered to mark  the 77th anniversary of the Fall of Bataan and Corregidor. On April 9 and May 6, 1942, over 72,000 Filipino and American soldiers surrendered to Japanese Imperial Forces and were forced to march for over 65 miles to prison camps. In the infamous Bataan Death March, approximately 10,000 Filipino and 700 American soldiers died.

“Here at this national shrine of service, we pause to reflect on their service, to remember their courage, and their resilience in the face of death,” Huntoon added. “Learning about and teaching others the stories of these heroic soldiers from the U.S. and from the Philippines matters. In doing so, we are reminded of our common values, of our purposeful lives, and of our mutual respect and compassion for each other that transcends and, in time, can surmount the pain and suffering of war.”

A 40-year veteran with the U.S. Army, Huntoon served as Superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. He has a deep personal connection with the war in the Pacific as his father worked in the staff of General Douglas MacArthur during the New Guinea campaign. His father-in-law was assigned at Clark Air Force Base for a number of years.


Ambassador Romualdez leads the wreath-laying ceremony at the National World War II Memorial.

In his remarks, Philippine Ambassador Jose Manuel G. Romualdez noted that this year’s theme of the “Day of Valor” or “Araw ng Kagitingan” is “Sakripisyo ng Beterano ay Gunitain, Gawing Tanglaw ng Kabataan Tungo sa Kaunlaran.”

This theme “underscores the sacrifices of our war veterans and urges our youth to draw inspiration from this selfless act of giving oneself so that they too can contribute to the ad­vancement of this nation,” Romualdez said. “Knowledge of history is an essential guide to the future. We have to know where we have been and what brought us to the present, in order to be able to chart a course toward a better tomorrow.”

Brig. Gen. Marlo M. Guloy, Defense and Armed Forces Attache of the Philippine Embassy, expanded on the ambassador’s point by citing Proclamation No. 466, S. 1989, designating April 5 to 11 of every year as Philippine Veterans Week, in order to “promote, preserve and memorialize the principles, ideals and deeds of the Filipino war veteran as a means to enhance patriotism and love of country, especially among the youth of the land.”

The great task remaining


Filipino World War II Veterans Celestino Almeda (left) and Rey Cabacar.

Attending the commemoration, which included a wreath-laying ceremony, were two Filipino World War II Veterans: 101-year-old Celestino Almeda of Gaithersburg, MD. and 91-year-old Rey Cabacar of Ft. Washington, MD. They are two of the only four living veterans residing in the Washington, D.C. area. “Ten years ago, there were more than a dozen of us who were still around,” Cabacar recalls. “I miss my friends especially on occasions like this.” Cabacar keeps himself busy by volunteering with the Veterans of Foreign Wars and other community service projects.

Despite his age, Almeda is still able to attend public events and, with a strong and forceful voice, always has something to say. This time, at the end of the ceremony, he spoke about his passionate love of country and democracy. Quoting lines from Lincoln’s Gettysburg address, he wondered if the nation he fought for had “a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people by the people for the people, will perish from the earth?” He reminded the audience: “We did our best to fight for democracy in the Philippines. But today, it’s going nowhere. Are we going to allow it to perish from the earth? Please rise to maintain democracy in the Philippines.”

That is the great task remaining before the Filipino people, Almeda implied, so that those who died shall not have died in vain.

In his closing remarks, Commodore Elson Aguilar, the Philippine Embassy’s Director of Philippine Veterans Affairs, said the best way to “repay the sacrifices of our veterans” is to get involved in veteran-related activities, such as participating in the annual Bataan Memorial Death March in White Sands, New Mexico and the Freedom Trail Death March in the Philippines, which is organized by the Department of National Defense and the Philippine Veterans Bank. He also urged support for FilVetREP’s Congressional Gold Medal project, which is now in its education phase.


Maj. Gen. Antonio Taguba (US Army Ret) opens the Bataan & Corregidor Day commemoration.

Also participating in the hour-long ceremony were the U.S. Armed Forces Color Guard and Filipino American stage actor Justine de Guzman Moral, who sang the Philippine and US National Anthems.

 

War and Memory

 At a reception held at the Philippine Chancery following the wreath-laying ceremony, the Filipino Veterans Recognition and Education Project (FilVetREP) presented a slide show on the recently-concluded Bataan Memorial Death March. FilVetREP executive committee member Sonny Busa opened the presentation by citing a quote by Vietnamese Pulitzer Prize novelist Viet Thanh Nguyen: “All wars are fought twice, the first time on the battlefield, the second time in memory.”

“Our participation in the Bataan Memorial Death March in the last six years has raised greater awareness about the role of Filipino soldiers, 9,000 of whom died in that 65-mile march from Bataan to prison camps,” Busa said. “Not very many people even knew that Bataan is in the Philippines. Today, the Philippines has a prominent presence in this annual event. But it is more than just a marathon. It is a meaningful way of remembering the courage of death march survivors who endured a horrendous experience. Those who could no longer keep pace with the march due to starvation, lack of water, shelter and medicine were beaten, bayoneted, shot while others were beheaded by the Japanese Imperial Army soldiers.

Busa encouraged more participation from the community next year, which will be held on March 15 at the White Sands Missile Range. This year, 30 FilVetREP members and their families joined as marchers and volunteers.

The next mission: Education

FilVetREP National Chairman Retired Maj. Gen. Antonio Taguba is now leading a nationwide effort to build a digital national education platform to complement the Congressional Gold Medal, which will be displayed at a major national museum, possibly at the Smithsonian’s American History museum.  “The medal is not just a piece of metal,” he says. “It symbolizes the service and sacrifice of Filipino and American soldiers who fought under the American flag and made the ultimate sacrifice. Their stories are deeply moving and compelling. They need to be enshrined in American history and preserved for posterity so the next generation of Americans will learn what happened not only during the war, but after the war.”

The first phase of FilVetREP’s mission is almost completed, with more than 1,500 medals awarded at 56 ceremonies in the U.S. and three in the Philippines. FilVetREP’s task now is to collect memorabilia, souvenirs, letters, oral histories and other documents related to the war in the Philippines.

The plan is to launch a digital interactive program with an educational curriculum that’s accessible in classrooms, libraries and other public spaces. “We wish to educate the American public on the extraordinary acts of valor and selfless sacrifice of Filipino American soldiers in defense of the United States of America,” Taguba said. “Their exemplary story of patriotism, citizenship and courage embodied the American values of freedom and democracy.”

 

 

THE 7TH KALAYAAN-LA 2019, FEATURES RUBY IBARRA

For Immediate Release
KALAYAAN LA 2019
April 13, 2019

THE 7TH KALAYAAN-LA 2019, FEATURES RUBY IBARRA

LOS ANGELES – MABUHAY ANG IKA-121 TAON NG ARAW NG KALAYAAN!

The 7TH KALAYAAN 2019 Independence Day Festival Committe, The LEVITT Foundation and District 1 City Council OFfice of Gil Cedillo announced today that the 7th KALAYAAN Parade will be held on June 8, 2019 from Mariposa St to MacArthur Park instead of the Historic FIlipinotown.

The HFT KALAYAAN Parade used to be held at Historic Filipinotown along the Beverly-Tempke Corridor for the past 6 years from 2013, But now it will go mainstram along Wilshire Blvd. in District 1 at Central LA at Westlake District.

The HFT Kalayaan Parade and Festival will be now known as KALAYAAN LA. For 2019, the KALAYAA LA, the LEvitt Fundation and District 1 oOffice of Councilmember Gil Cedill will feature FilAm Rap Artist from the Bay Area, RUBY IBARRA and Kulintang Artist GINGEE on June 8 , 2019 at PArkview St, MacArthur Park.

7th KALAYAAN Parade, June 8, 2019

The 7th KALAYAAN LA PArade will start at MAriposa and Wishire St. at tthe PH Consulate General in LA to MacArthur PArk, PArk View and 7th Streets on June 8, 2019 starting at 11i;00 AM.

Assembly time is at 10 AM. Assembly are is at Msriposa St between Wilshire and 6th Strret.The parade start at 11 Am. Its first come first served basis.

For the parade participation,assembly area and time please contact the Parade Coordinator Art P. GArcia at (213)318-9065 or email at jfavusa8@gmail,com. Also visit our website at www.jfavusa.org

The 7TH KALAYAAN-LA 2019 Festival

Meanwhile The 7th KALAYAAN 2019 Independence Day Festival will feature Rap Artist RUBY IBARRA and Kulintang Artis GINGEEon June 8 , 2019 at PArkview St, MacArthur Park.

There will be entertainment, cultural shows, fashion show, youth workshops and spoken word , singing contest , battle of the bands, foods and a lot fun.

Join us at the 7thKALAYAAN FEstival from 12 noon up to 9 pm on SAturday and from 1o AM to 7 PM on SUnday.

For the festival booths and entertaiment opportunities as well as
the souvenir program please call the Festival Coordinaitor Freddie at (818)-350-9609 or email at famecorp888@gmail.com

7th Kalayaan 2019 Contacts

For other matters , ads and sponsorship opportunies please \contact the over-all coordinator Thelma Sugay at (747)-221-2322 or email at thelma@jmasgroup@gmail.com

For BINIBINING KALAYAAN-LA 2019 Pageant applications and requeirment and canvasssing schedules please contact Jojo at ( 213)-318-5104 or Art at (213) 318-9065 or email at jfavusa8@gmail.com

END

####

JFAV STATEMENT ON the 77th YEAR OF THE BATAAN DEATH MARCH

JFAV UPDATES

April 11, 2019

JFAV STATEMENT OF THE 77TH DEATH MARCH, April 9-17, 1942.17861640_10209312161907152_4051967218038363143_n

Los Angeles– -Today, 77 years ago, the brutal Bataan Death march started on April 9, 1942  and ended at Camp O’Donell, Capas, Tarlac on April 17, 1942.

It is apt and proper that the KmB and SIKAP or CCAPS honor this day with their  SIKAP culmination ceremonies at PWC, April 12, 2107 at 6:00PM at Advancing Justice at Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles.

The Justice For Filipino American Veterans (JFAV) the national lobby and advocacy alliance for Filipino World War II Veterans rights and welfare, also pays tribute to the fallen and living heroes of The BATAAN DEATH MARCH

The Death March, April 9-17, 194275BD2017

In the BATAAN DEATH MARCH, more than 75,000 USAFFE soldiers were forced to march from Mariveles, Bataan to San Fernando, Pampanga. And then were transported by train and marched from Capas, Tarlac to Camp P’Donnel prisoner of war camp (POW camp).

In the process. more than 18,000 Filipino soldiers and more than 1,,000 Americans died during the “Death March”

Actually more USAFFE soldiers died in the Death march than the 130 days Battle for Bataan.

No Justice and Equity, No Peace17883840_1445924008814937_9110453383109856924_n

77 years later, JFAV is still fighting in the  US Congress so their rights and privileges be restored , their monthly pension be given to them and to their 60,000 survivors.

The worst racism suffered by Filipinos is to be not recognized as an American Veterans . While the Japanese-American who suffered the same racism were compensated by the US government in 1982.

JFAV pledged that they will continue to struggle for veterans equity and justice no matter how long the struggle maybe. The injury to one, is an injury for all.

Makibaka Para sa Katarungan at Pagkakapantay-pantay!
Fight racism and racial discrimination.
Remember Bataan!

Arturo P. Garcia
JFAV National Coordinator

April 11, 2019

Los Angeles. CA

The Pantingan River massacre

JFAV UPDATES

April 11, 2019

The Pantingan River massacre (Filipino: Pagpatay sa Ilog Pantingan).

LOS ANGELES— The Pantingan River Massacre took place during the Bataan Death March in mid-April 1942.

Several hundred soldiers from the Philippine Commonwealth Army‘s 1st, 11th, 71st, and 91st Divisions on the march to the north of Mount Samat where the Pantingan River crosses the PilarBagac Road were taken to the riverside.

Most of them were shot, bayoneted or beheaded by the Imperial Japanese Army.[

The atrocity was attributed to Japanese Colonel Masanobu Tsuji. Following Tsuji’s abnormal order which was considered to be a war crime and beyond his commission, Japanese 122 Regiment of Sixty-fifth Brigade executed the US and Philippine soldiers in the Pantingan River

Colonel Takeo Imai, of another Japanese regiment, doubted the authority of the order which came from the top but not clearly from who ? Imai ignored the cruel order and did not execute anyone

Survivors of the massacre include Lt. Manuel Yan who later became the head of the Philippine Army and ambassador to Thailand. Another survivor, Capt. Ricardo Papa, a G-3 Officer of the 91st Division later became a Chief of Police in Manila.

END

###

 

 

WRITERS IN WAR

 

EPCC NEWS

April 10, 2019

Writers in war(1)

By Elmer Ordonez

LOS ANGELES--The fall of Bataan Day recalls what our writers did during the Pacific War from day one.

Carlos P. Romulo and Salvador P. Lopez, close colleagues at the Philippines Herald, joined the propaganda staff of the USAFFE.

The Herald at DMHM was among those buildings destroyed during the bombing of the Intramuros river front when Manila was declared Open City on the last days of December 1941.

Sent to Corregidor Romulo, before taking the last speed boat to Corregidor, dropped by Manila Hotel to take in some extra provisions.

He saw at the dance pavilion what he described as a scene straight from a Luis Bunuel film — Caucasian couples in a slow drag, cheek to cheek, to the music of a Filipino band.

It was New Year’s Eve and the Port Area was burning and looters were all over the place.

The Japanese entered the city the following day. Romulo left behind his family when he went to Corregidor as part of MacArthur’s staff in the Malinta Tunnel.to leave with MacArthur in his escape to Australia in March a few weeks before the fall of Bataan, Romulo managed to cross over to Bataan to take a plane leaving at the last moment.

The plane could hardly take off because of overloading so those on board were told to cast off their personal belongings — everything including his beloved ivory plated pistol.

Any moment Bataan would fall.

After the war Romulo wrote a book “I Was the Last Man Out of Bataan.”

Cold-blooded murder in Bataan

REVEILLE

Cold-blooded murder in Bataan

/ 09:07 AM April 08, 2019

Last week, I asked a young lady from Balanga, Bataan, what she knew about the events that took place in her home province 77 years ago. Understandably, she only had sketchy ideas about what happened during those fateful days in April 1942, and why tomorrow is a national holiday.

Let me provide some background.

In December 1941, Japanese forces attacked US military installations in the Philippines destroying much of what represented American air power in the region. After three months of heavy fighting in the Bataan Peninsula, Maj. Gen. Edward King, commander of Luzon Force defending the Peninsula, surrendered to Japan’s 14th Army led by Gen. Masaharu Homma on April 9, 1942.

David McCullough in his prize-winning biography of President Harry Truman described the capitulation as “the largest surrender of an American force since Appomattox.” (Appomattox, a small village in Virginia, was the scene of Gen. Robert E. Lee’s surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia to Gen. Ulysses Grant in 1865, signaling the end of the US Civil War. The surrender also took place on April 9. Lee surrendered an army of 28,000, while King gave up a Fil-American force of 75,000.)

Not many people are aware that King surrendered without informing his immediate superior, Lt. Gen. Jonathan Wainwright, the commander of US Forces in the Philippines who had replaced
Gen. Douglas MacArthur.

Upon learning of the surrender “MacArthur was shocked and demanded of Wainwright a full explanation of King’s conduct. Wainwright replied that he had expressly forbidden such action and that King did not broach the subject of capitulation to him.” Nevertheless Wainwright refused to criticize King because “the decision which he was forced to make required unusual courage and strength of character.”

Tomorrow, we shall mark Araw ng Kagitingan with the traditional visit by the President or his representative accompanied by Japanese and American embassy officials to the Dambana ng Kagitingan on Mount Samat. We shall once again recall the heroism of men who fought fierce battles in Bataan. We shall relive the Death March and remember the concentration camp atrocities at O’Donnell in Tarlac.

In our thoughts and prayers, let us not forget what happened to some 350 to 400 Filipino officers and men of the 91st Philippine Army Division.

On April 11, 1942, just two days after the surrender, this groupwas separated from their American colleagues and moved to the Pantingan River that crosses the Pilar-Bagac road. In his book “Bataan: The March of Death,” American military historian Stanley Falk describes what took place after the separation:

“The captives were formed into three groups and their wrists tied securely with double-strand telephone wire… At a given signal, the execution began. Japanese officers moved down the line from one end, mercilessly beheading the luckless Filipinos with their gleaming sabers. From the other end, Japanese enlisted men worked toward them, methodically plunging their bayonets into the backs of the prisoners.

For two hours the grisly slaughter continued, the Japanese sweating at their work in the hot sun, pausing to wipe away the perspiration and then returning to their grim task…” When the slaughter was over, only a few prisoners remained alive buried beneath their slain comrades.

The massacre of Filipino officers and non-coms of the 91st Philippine Army Division remains a mystery of the Bataan saga that has never been fully explained. It was apparently aimed only at Filipinos. And yet, in our commemoration of Araw ng Kagitingan, there is hardly any mention of the event.

Much of the national attention centers on the Death March. Painful as it may be, we must confront the fact that what took place was not the usual loss of life in battle — it was a case of the cold-blooded mass murder of prisoners of war.

Have we ever identified who were these officers and men? There should be a roster somewhere of the men belonging to the division. Why were they singled out for execution? Have we dedicated a special portion of our commemorations to remember their memory?

How often in world conflicts covered by the Geneva Convention have prisoners of war been treated in such an outrageous manner and then are forgotten by the nation they served? After the war, Homma was tried by an American tribunal for atrocities committed by his troops during the Bataan Death March. Apparently, the mass murder at the Pantingan River was not among the charges made against him.

Each year our national leaders celebrate Araw ng Kagitingan with speeches about the heroism and valor of those who fought in Bataan. Let us also remember those who lost their lives, victims of inhuman conduct by a savage enemy flushed with victory.

rjfarolan56@gmail.com

END
###