Monthly Archives: April 2017

The US-Russian Connection

KOMUNIDAD
April 12, 2017

The US-Russian Connectionputin

By Arturo P. Garcia

Many Americans are still baffled by the US-Russian connection. They readily forget that once, Russia and the United States were allies during the dark days of World War II.

They forgot that Stalin and FDR were close. As close as Churchill and FDR themselves. In fact it was FDR that moderated both leaders when they are at the loggerheads especially on the question of strategy and tactics in defeating their Axis enemies.

Actually it was FDR who forced Churchill to open up a second front in Africa and in France. If Churchill prevailed, he loved Germany to defeat Russia when the Axis invaded Russia in June 1941. He even delayed the invasion of France until the Russian decisively defeated the German at the Battle of Kursk in 1943.

FDR is a consummate statesman. He even tempered Stalin when he wanted to dictate on the Allies during the Teheran Conference on the division of Europe after the War. Churchill was Russia’s avowed enemy, he paid dearly for his mistakes.

On the other FDR got Stalin’s respect. He even called each other “Uncle Joe” and “Uncle Frank”. While they chide Churchill as “Old Winnie.”

And because the avowed religion of the United States is “anti-communism”, many Americans loved this relic of the cold war. Thus many are avowed anti-Russia and are against anything Russian.

This exemplified by Hillary Clinton, the State Department and Pentagon. During the presidency of Obama, they fomented the war in Ukraine and Ossetia in Russia in Europe; overthrow Gaddafi in Libya, fomented war in Sudan, tried to divide Iraq that resulted in the rise of Al Queda and then the Isis in Iraq and Syria.

For ten long years the US from Bush to Obama and now Trump tried to overthrow Assad in Syria in the Middle East. All for their anti-Russia crusade. But still Assad still stand with his Russian allies.

ISIS-Controlled-AreasAs a result, instability reigns everywhere the US effected “regime change” such as Libya, Iraq ,Ukraine and Turkey. In places where the people took steps like the “Arab Spring” in Egypt, Tunisia and in Syria, the Al Queda or ISIS took over and made life harder for the US policy makers.

But Russia’s Putin who is much tougher and more pragmatic than Obama, took bolder steps. In Ukraine, they initiated the formation of an independent and more militant “East Ukraine Pro-Russian autonomous government. And military support the pro-Russian government in East Ukraine. Russia also supported Assad in Syria, both militarily and diplomatically. To the consternation of the United States.

abe-speaking-trump0Now Trump has been linked to the Russians. The worst. The democrats have charged that “Trump’s Russian Connections” made him win. They are making it appear that Trump’s win in 2016 is through the manipulation of the Russians and Putin.

But Trump is just being pragmatic. He prides himself to be a tough negotiator by being a successful businessman and a media tycoon. His winning the Presidential race in 2016 defied popular surveys that predicted a Hillary Clinton win. This made him more antagonistic to the mainstream media.

His military strike against Syria made him look antagonistic towards Putin and Russia. But he made a crucial call to Russia before the missile strike in a Syrian airfield hours before he gave the go-signal.

If he will outdo FDR or make a difference in the world of diplomacy towards Russia and other nations like China, DPRK and Iran, it’s still a long way to go. He has still to complete his four years term.

As an Asian leader said; “ the test of the pudding is in the eating.”

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SIKAP (CCAPS) CULMINATION CEREMONIES, April 15 at PWC-LA

FAI NEWS
April 12, 2017

SIKAP (CCAPS) CULMINATION CEREMONIES, April 15 at PWC-LA17883840_1445924008814937_9110453383109856924_n

Los Angeles– ” No History, No Self”

The SIKAP (CCAPS or California Coalition Advancing Pilipinx Studies) cordially inivte the pubic to the Pilipinx Visibility Week Culmination Ceremony: Resistance is Stronger (Mas Malakas ang Pakikibaka) will be held this Saturday April 15th at Pilipino Workers Center, Los Angeles from 6-8 PM.

This is to continue to fight for the inclusion of Ethnic Studies in higher education. One of Kabataang maka-Bayan or KmB / Pro-People Youth’s main campaigns is SIKAP (CCAPS or California Coalition Advancing Pilipinx Studies).

Culmination Ceremonies, April 15.17855622_1446710082069663_6756678528823996045_o

On Saturday, April 15 is the culminanation ceremonies for the Pilipinx Visibility Week (April 9th-15th) held respectively at 9 different campuses, Cal Poly Pomona, UC Irvine, UCLA, UCSB, USC, Cal State LA, Cal State Dominguez Hills, Cal State Fullerton, and Claremont Colleges, this is a community forum with PACN performances, a keynote to speak about the history and current state of Pilipinx Studies, an interactive mural to write our stories, and more. Refreshments are provided by Dollar Hits LA (melon juice), and more to be announced.

Beforehand, feel free to join the social media campaign by taking your photo with a whiteboard and answering one of the following questions:

Why do you think Pilipinx deserve to be visible?
Pilipinx Studies means…
What does Pilipinx Visibility mean to you?
Why is Pilipinx Studies important?

Use the hashtags: #PVW2017 #PilipinxVisibilityWeek #PilipinxINvisibility#SIKAP #PilipinxStudiesNOW

SIKAP or CCAPS

SIKAP is comprised of educators, students, and community organizers: Cal Poly Pomona Pilipino American Studies Kollective, UCI Kababayan, UCLA Samahang Pilipino, USC Troy Philippines, Cal State LA Kalahi, Cal State Dominguez Hills Pagsikapan, Cal State Fullerton Pilipino-American Students Association, Claremont Colleges Kasama, and KmB / Pro-People Youth.

This coalition strives for the advancement of Pilipinx Studies on campus, in the community, and beyond. For its fourth consecutive year, each college organization presents Pilipinx Visibility Week from Sunday, April 9th to Saturday, April 15th. See attached for solidarity schedule.

PARKING: Free on the street
ADMISSION: Free

KEYNOTE: Ivy Quicho, AF3IRM National Chairperson
SOUND SELECTION: DJ J the YB of Sessions LA

END

***

THE TIES THAT BINDS

CULTURAL NOTES
April 12, 2017

THE TIES THAT BINDS

By Arturo P. Garcia

“The relations between DPRK and the People’s Republic of China is like the teeth and the lips”ana11

That’s how close the relations of China to DORK or North Korea was described by its government and party officials. All throughout the 67 years of their fraternal relations.

After US President Trump attacked Syria with missiles while he met with PRC’s President Xi Jing Pei in Florida, he sent another naval task force into the Northern Pacific in an apparent show of force.
President Donald Trump tweeted Tuesday that the US will “solve the North Korea problem” alone if China refuses to help.”

“North Korea is looking for trouble. If China decides to help, that would be great. If not, we will solve the problem without them! U.S.A,” he tweeted.”

“I explained to the President of China that a trade deal with the US will be far better for them if they solve the North Korean problem,” Trump also tweeted. Trump has the right to be suspicious.

By sending a naval task force to the Northern Pacific against the DPRK, Trump is provoking the DPRK and brings the world into a brink of a thermo-nuclear war or another regional war in the Pacific.

DPRK Is ready to Defend Itself. DPRK is not a push-over. It has nuclear capabilities that is aimed at US forces in Japan and South Korea. DPRK can defend itself from US aggression. It has defeated the American aggression in the 1950’s . It is ready to defend itself again despite US military provocations.

Trump’s gambit of trying to bring the People’s Republic of China against it’s ally-the DPRK will not succeed.

The history of solidarity and friendship between DPRK goes back during their anti-Japanese struggle during World War II and their resist American aggression during the Korean conflict from 1950-53.

The PRC helped DPRK defend Korea and almost defeated the US if not for the UN armed intervention.PRC under Mao Ze Dong sent a 300,000 Chinese People’s Volunteer (PCV) to help the stem the tide
of the US invasion of Korea in June 1950.

China has warned the US not to cross the Yalu River, the boundary between China and DPRK. But China did not wait until the US and the ROK Army was near the Yalu River when Mao sent the PCV under Field Marshall Peng Deng Huai.20160402_LDD001_facebook

The joint PCV and the DPRK’s People’s Army pushed the US Army and the UN forces all the way the 38th Parallell until a truce agreement was signed in 1953.

China also helped the DPRK to rebuild economically after the truce in 1953. The PRC only left the nation when they were able to rebuild in 1961.

US Out Of Korea! Unlike the United States that still keeps their bases and more than 30,000 American troops in South Korea and are conducting provocative military exercises.

The US military presence is a proof enough to show who is the aggressor country in the Korean peninsula for the last 67 years.

The Alliance-Philippines and all progressives all over the world condemns Trump’s warmongering tactics against its perceived enemies especially China in the South China seas and Northern Pacific against DPRK and Russia.

The Alliance also supports the reunification of the two Korea’s. They also vehemently condemn the American posturing for war and intimidation in its support for japan and against Russia, China and the DPRK in Asia-Pacific.

***

EPNC DIVIDES HFT DISTRICT, FIXED THE BOUNDARIES AT GLENDALE

FAI NEWS
April 11, 2017

EPNC DIVIDES HFT DISTRICT, FIXED THE BOUNDARIES AT GLENDALE17758320_10209186349961157_7395243152848819678_o

Los Angeles—The good news. The Echo Park Neighborhood Council (EPNC) decided tonight, April 4, 2017 to fix the Historic Filipinotown district in Glendale Blvd. by a unanimous vote of 17-0 .

The bad news is that the Filipino community leaders still do not want their district into two, but decided to respect the EPNC vote.

Thus, District 5 from the East, Glendale Blvd to Beaudy St. will now be known as District 5 and Glendale Blvd West to Benton way will be known as District 6. As epr the EPNC decision.

Tactical Victory

Although it was not the decision that the FilAm community of Historic FIlipinotown was expecting, it was better than the EPNC scheme to disempower the Filipinos in their own district.

If the scheme of some racists people the EPNC succeeded, District 6 or the new HFT District will lose 2/3 of its site. But by the new EPNC decision, the boundaries were preserved into 2/3 of its original.

Some EPNC members argued that Bonnie Brae boundary is better because there is less population in East Glendale Blvd to because it is a ‘ semi-industrial sites and less residential.”

In Full Force17761243_10209184779041885_3374006598108393106_o

Some EPNC member argued that the EPNC must respect the cultural identity of HFT. Joselyn Geaga-Rosenthal pointed out that 75% of the institutions and cultural heritage sites are located west of Glendale Blvd.”

Dr. Arturo Flores said, “ it is important to preserve the cultural heritage of Histroric Filipinotown where FACLA, the Filipino Christian Church(FCC), Burlington School and St.Columban Church is located.”

The EPNC first nominal voting was 14-3 in favor of the Glendale boundary. And when the formal voting for the resolution was made, it was unanimous, 17-0.

The Filam community leaders came up to the table and congratulated the EPNC for considering the boundary to Glendale blvd where the marker for Historic Filipinotown was located.

Still, it was a victory for the Historic Filipinotown community.

END.

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ALLIANCE PHILIPPINES SAYS NO TO TRUMP WARMONGERING IN THE PACIFIC

ALLIANCE NEWS
April 11, 2017

ALLIANCE PHILIPPINES SAYS NO TO TRUMP WARMONGERING IN THE PACIFICana11

Los Angeles—First, it was Syria, now it’s the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK).

After US President Trump attacked Syria with missiles while he met with PRC’s President Xi Jing Pei in Florida, he sent another naval task force into the Northern Pacific in an apparent show of force.

By sending a naval task force to the Northern Pacific against the DPRK, Trump is provoking the DPRK and brings the world into a brink of a thermo-nuclear war or another regional war in the Pacific.

DPRK Is Ready to Defend Itself.murasame-class-destroyer-js-inazuma-co-jd-abs-021417

DPRK is not a push-over. It has nuclear capabilities that is aimed at US forces in Japan and South Korea. DPRK can defend itself from US aggression. It has defeated the American aggression in the 1950’s . It is ready to defend itself again despite US military provocations.

Trump’s gambit of trying to bring the People’s Republic of China against it’s ally-the DPRK will not succeed.The history of solidarity and friendship between DPRK goes back during their anti-Japanese struggle during World War II and their resist American aggression during the Korean conflict from 1950-53.

The PRC helped DPRK defend Korea and almost defeated the US if not for the UN armed intervention. China also helped the DPRK to rebuild after the truce in 1953. The PRC only left the nation when they were able to rebuild in 1961.

US Out Of Korea!13631393_1260447177323314_8486258530909940521_n

Unlike the United States that still keeps their bases and more than 30,000 American troops in South Korea and are conducting provocative military exercises, the US military presence is a proof enough to show who is the aggressor country in the Korean peninsula for the last 67 years.

The Alliance-Philippines condemns Trump’s warmongering tactics against its perceived enemies especially China in the South China seas and Northern Pacific against DPRK and Russia.

The Alliance supports the reunification of the two Korea’s and vehemently condemn the American posturing for war and intimidation in its support for Japan and against Russia, China and the DPRK in Asia-Pacific.

END

***

MALACANANG: PUGAD NG MGA AHAS

SALAG/BANAT
Abril 11, 2017

MALACANANG: PUGAD NG MGA AHAS

Ni Arturo P. Garcia

Isang batikang mamahayag at kaibigan ang nagsabing; “ Ang anumang palasyo tulad ng Malacanang o lunan ng kapangyarihan ay “pugad ng mga ahas.” Sa Ingles ay “snake pit”

Sabagay dahil Semana Santa, alalahanin nating ahas din ang tumukso kina Eba at Adan sa Paraiso kaya sila napatalsik sa kaharian ng diyos.

Kaya totoo rin ang kasabihang ito. Dahil na sa palasyo, ang bawat indibidwal ay nais magkamal ng kapangyarihan, maging matalik na tagapayo ng Hari o Reyna o sinumang pangulong nasa kapangyarihan.

Kaya laganap ang intriga, pasikatan, balyahan, tulakan para mapalapit o mahawaan man lang ng kapangyarihan ng mga naghahari. Kaya ito ang nangyari kay PDUT kamakailan lang.

***

Sa ngalan ng diumano’y ‘kampanya laban sa katiwalian” sinibak ni PDUT ang Kalihim ng DILG na si Mike Sueno. Nasibak si Mike Seuno dahil diumano sa pagbili ng mga trak ng bumbero mula sa Austria. Inireklamo ito ng tatlong Usec ni Sueno sa DILG at nang makarating kay PDUT ang ‘White Paper” ng DILG. Sinibak niya si Sueno pagkatapos ng miting ng gabinete.

Pagkatapos ang Under-Secretary ng Secretary of the Cabinet, Jun Evasco na si Maya Hilmen Valdez. Ito daw ang patunay na di niya papayagan na magkaroon ng katiwalian sa kanyang administrasyon.

Sinibak din niya si Atty. Valdez dahil daw sa pagpayag nito sa commercial importation ng bigas. Ang depensa naman ni Valdez, ang away hindi dahil sa kanya at sa katiwalian sa NFA, kundi ito ay ayaw nina Jun Evasco at Kalihim Manny Pinol na gusto raw kopohin ang kontrol sa NFA.

**

Ang siste, aon sa ibang political analysts, mas laganap naman daw ang katiwalian sa Bureau of Immigration (BI) at sa Deparment of Transportation (DOTR) dahil sa pagtatayo ng Central Station sa EDSA. Pinag-awayan ito ng Ayala Corporation at the SM Group of Companies.

Pero tahimik lang si Digong o PDUT dito. Hindi pa rin niya nagagawa ang ginawa ni Noynoy Aquino nang ipinakulong niya sina dating Presidente Gloria-Macapagal-Arroyo, sina Senador Juan Ponce -Enrile, Estrada at Revilla noong siya ang Presidente.

Hanggang ngawa lamang si PDUT. Wala pa siyang napapakulong na malaking isda. At ang masama, kaibigan niya kasi sina GMA, Enrile, Estrada at Revilla. Sa katunayan, binisita pa niya ang mga ito sa kulungan sa Camp Crame.

***

Sino ba ang maniniwala kay PDUT kundi ang kanyang panatikong tagasunod at mga kapwa DDS? Kaya ako ay hindi naniniwala sa mga survey na nagsasabing popular pa rin si PDUT. Ito ang negosyo ng mga survey group.

Ganito rin ang mga survey groups sa Amerika. Paniwalang-paniwala silang mananalo sa Hilary Clinton noog eleksyon ng 2016. Ang siste naniwala sila sa kanilang sariling survey.

Kaya pagdating ng resulta ng eleksyon, lahat sila ay nabutata dahil ang nanalo ay si Trump ng GP. Natrumpo silang lahat ni Trump nang mahalal itong president ng Amerika noong Nobyembre 2016.

Magsilbing aral sana ito sa mga survey group tulad ng SWS, Pulse Asia atbp.

Huwag ninyong pangunahan ang publiko at baka sa huli, mabutatata kayo!

***

THE BATAAN DEATH MARCH, APRIL 9-15, 1942

JFAV UPDATES

Abril 10,2017

THE BATAAN DEATH MARCH, APRIL 9-15, 1942death-march2

By Lt. Felipe Buencamino

Los Angeles–Tension and confrontation among surrendering troops; the instructions of two Filipino generals; and the start of the long trek to Camp O’Donnell, with thirst, exhaustion, tears and death along the way. Death March diary-memoir of Lt. Felipe Buencamino III, April 10-15, 1942:

Morning came, and we were ordered to stack our guns and disarm. The white flag was raised on top of the highest hill. All Filipino troops in Bataan were going to surrender together. It was already nine o’clock… but still there were no Japs. We knew we were completely surrounded, but they were taking their time.

Some of the boys were crying –Teddy Arvisu, for example. Others were happy. They were glad the fighting was over, no matter how it ended. But the boys were mistaken. It was not all over yet.

Some twenty Americans armed themselves with machine-guns and started firing at the disarmed troops of General [Vicente] Lim. “You dirty cowards!” hollered the Americans. There was a big commotion. Then the desperate group of Yanks machinegunned a Jap observation plane that flew very low to verify the white flag. The plane was almost hit. It came back with a squadron of bombers and they rained tons of death on the unarmed troops. Generals [Simeon] de Jesus and [Vicente] Lim gave me an order that I will never forget.

“Buencamino,” said Gen. Lim, “go to the Japanese line… and inform them that there are two Filipino generals here… who are surrending their troops.” I was sore. They were making a trial goat out of me. After having lived through the whole war… I was not in a mood to take anymore chances. How was I to know the Japanese were going to respect the white flag? Besides some ignorant Jap… still furious… might take a pot shot at me. Anyway, orders were orders and I proceeded to comply with it. Oscar [Arellano] saw me… and he embraced me. “I’m going with you,” he said.

We went up the first hill… and there below us… we saw hundred of trucks and cars blocking the road. We had to turn around… to find another route. Just then… I saw Pepito Castillo and Nene Gallaga. They were pale… and panting. “What happened?” I inquired. “Gosh,” said Gallaga, “we were carrying white flags and several Jap patrols machine-gunned us.”

I returned to General Lim. I told him: “I cannot comply with your order. As an officer, I have the right to choose between surrender or not. I do not wish to surrender.” Then Gallaga told General Lim what had happened. Lim understood.

By about eleven o’clock… the Japanese troops arrived. We were informed by them that General [Edward] King had surrendered. We were disarmed completely, and they told us to walk up to Manila. “You are free because you are Filipinos,” they said. I thought: this is too good to be true. There was a catch… and it didn’t take long before we found out.

We walked together: Ramon, Tony Nieva, Ernie [Escaler], Willie Jacinto, Paeng Estrada, Fred [Ruiz] Castro, Johnnie Fabella, and myself. We carried one can of Carnation milk each and two cans of pork beans. We were told that at Orani we would be given trucks to go to Manila… and we believed them… and thanked them. So we walked on… and on… and on.

The sun was very hot. But we didn’t care. We wanted to get home. Ramon walked with a sweater and blanket wrapped around him. I was sustaining him most of the time. He tried his best not to be a “drag.” Chalito [Zamora] was quite the contrary. He was always complaining of the heat. Every five kilometers we would halt. Ernie gave us pep talks. “Carry on,” he said. “In a few days, we will be with our families.”

Mariveles, Bataan

The main body of the Japanese forces were walking past us. Their tanks, trucks, cannons, cars, horses, troops rumbled by us. We had to run out of the road, because they didn’t give a damn about running over us. Japanese soldiers started taking our watches and money and canned goods. Some boys were stripped of their shirts. We endured all forms of indignities. After all, they were the victors. A Jap came up to Ramon… and he took of his sweater. We didn’t complain. It was best to be discreet. “Endure everything,” counseled Ernie, “that is the fate of the vanquished.” “After all,” said Tony Nieva, “we are getting off pretty easy.”

We trudged on and on that first day for almost fifteen kilometers. We were very thirsty. “I can’t… anymore,” cried Willie… and he dropped on the ground. We stayed around him… gave him pep talks. “I want a drink of water… even just a drop,” he begged. But there was no water. I pitied Willie… as a he lay there on the ground. We rested for half an hour… and then I made him sling his arm over my shoulders… and we walked on…

More Japanese troops passed by us: haughty, mocking. Some of the soldiers belonging to the 41st div. were commandeered by them. Some were made their servants… slaves.

But our little gang was left alone, thank God. When night came, we slept on a hillside. We were hungry and so for dinner we drank our cans of milk. I was so exhaustedI couldn’t take the pork and beans that Ernie thrust into my mouth. “Take it,” he shouted, “don’t be a fool. You’ve got to eat.”

I slept like a dead man that night. I had no bed, no pillow… just a blanket which Ernie shared. Johnnie was complaining of diarrhea… Ramon said he was getting better… but Tony was shivering. We gave him quinine. Willie Jacinto was pooped out… and Chalito Zamora had cramps. Godo Reyes was the strongest among us.

At about midnight, Ernie woke me up. There were strange cries. There was the voice of a woman, crying, pleading. Then there were other cries –female voices, too– and all had the same “spare-me-please” tone. We couldn’t move. I was tense. Then there were hoarse cries… soldiers… then shots that pierced the night… and the dull thud of bodies.

We woke up very early in the morning -before sunrise. We decided to walk… while it was cool. We rolled our blankets… and we moved towards Little Baguio. “Wish we had ham and eggs!” said Ramon jokingly. Nobody answered. We kept on walking… walking… walking. Finally, we reached Little Baguio. There we had our breakfast: water. The brook in Little Baguio was nice as ever. We filled our canteens and we filled ourselves up. We had a short rest… and we walked again.17523556_10206729870125576_4581999224885049990_n

On the roadside, we saw a lot of dead bodies, unlucky fellows who died just a few days before the end. There was an awful smell. Some corpses showed signs of torture before death. The wrists and ankles were bound, and the mouth gagged. Others had ugly wounds in their bellies, which proved they had hand-to-hand fighting. Most of the bodies were rotting, and there was no one to even give them a decent grave.

The sun was scorchingly hot by now, and I was getting dizzy with the heat. Tony Nieva was trying hard to walk… despite his malaria. Godo Reyes was still going strong… but I noticed that Ernie was weakening.

Noontime came… but we had no lunch. We just sat under a tree… and stared at each other. I saw a 3-year old girl… sitting beside a bush… crying. Her face was dusty. Where was her mother? I looked around… and in a nearby bush… there was an awful smell. There lay a rigid body, and the torn clothes and the bayonet thrusts on the body told the story. I felt like bringing the child with me… she looked sick and so hungry… but I left the child… without help. I can’t forgive myself. I tried to ease my conscience by saying that thousands of soldiers passed that child also… that many more would see it. I tried to tell myself that the Japanese Red Cross (surely, they probably had a Red Cross) would help the kid. As I walked and walked and walked… the child haunted me. But on the way… there were more such children… some asleep from sheer exhaustion… but still breathing. I carried one out of the curve… because a truck might just rumble over her. Again I felt like bringing the child. I already had her in my arms. But I laid her down alone… under a tree.

We walked on and on till it was dark, and we had no more strength. We found out that hunger does not matter very much… after a while… because your stomach becomes tense. My feet were beginning to hurt me. Ernie had big blisters. Ramon, too. Godo’s feet were bleeding. That night… we slept by a beach.

Before sunrise… we walked again… with nothing but water for breakfast. I saw more suffering. I saw an old man whom we thought dead… trying to say something because his lips were moving. His body was partly covered with mud and flies. His bones were sticking out. There he lay… dying. But we didn’t bother anymore about him. There were too many of them. I also saw a fellow soldier bayoneted by an angry Japanese soldier.He dropped to the ground… and he lay there… looking at us.. begging with his eyes for help… but nobody dared even give him a look of sympathy. I cursed everybody for not helping him… but I should also have cursed myself. I too didn’t dare.

Everywhere victims of catastrophe filled the roadside. Mobs of pitiful figures pleaded for food, begged for water. As we walked on and on and on… I saw more and more desperate-looking faces… smoke-blackened faces… some had bandaged heads and limbs. Then Japanese soldiers would come and start kicking them and having fun at the expense of the wounded soldiers. They would offer water then drop it before them. One man was shot for stealing rice from a parked Jap truck. Thousands slept on the roadside… right in the open… using their little bundles of worldly goods for pillows, and rags and paper for bedding. In every lane, suffering humanity squatted, stood, or lay wherever space was. I thought why don’t [Jorge] Vargas and our leaders do something to help these soldiers? I could not understand. Where were our social workers?

I kept on praying while I walked. More and more of the Japanese troops passed by. We avoided them. More soldiers dropped down out of sheer exhaustion. Ernie and Ramon were going crazy. They had no more water. They kept on looking and looking and asking and asking for water, water, water. They were thirsty, very thirsty. Willie Jacinto was saying “water-water-water” at every step. The routine was breaking my nerves. I shouted at Willie… told him to “Shut up!” He did… and I cried. Then we saw a canal. Instinctively… we all dove into it. there was the dead body of a Negro floating in the stagnant water. But we drank it… and it was good. I took a precaution. I poured a little bit of iodine in my cup. Never did I like my drink more.

Afternoon came… and we rested under a tree. Here, three Americans joined us. One of them –a major– told Ramon: “Say you… move out of there… so I can get the shade.” Ramon didn’t like the way the American said it. The major forgot that the war was over for us at least… and that we were now equal. Ramon got sore, shouted: “I take no orders from American cowards.” The major reddened. “You talk of equality… but when I was in your country… despite my money… I couldn’t dance with your girls.” The American said: “That’s what you give us after fighting for you!” “Whattha hell!” said Tony. “Who’s fighting for whom?” “Why you mutts never even went near the front?”

We left after a few minutes. On the way… I saw Japs kicking Americans sitting on the roadside. The Japanese preferred to hit Americans rather than Filipinos. There were mestizos… who I guess in peace-time… wouldn’t associate with Filipinos… that came to our gang begging to join us… so that they would not be mistaken for Americans. I couldn’t help thinking: “Here were Filipinos, trying to save themselves by the drop of Filipino blood which they were ashamed of all their lives.”

We walked on. Hundreds of thoughts filled my mind. Before Lamao… the fields were full of craters. Hundreds of exposed corpses rotted in the fields. The Japs had concentrated total fire on this area. The fields were sown with unfired grenades, shells, bullets. Here and there were helmets… torn shrapnel… half buried by recent rains that kindly interred the heads to which they were strapped. I saw a Jap stealing the pocketbook of a dead trainee. I saw a Jap officer undress the corpse of an officer in the rain. Walking along, I saw here and there a clenched fist… an arm… a leg.

Lamao, Bataan17634781_10210065786933931_5138926344385950446_n

Lamao… I rested in a shack. Here we found a fellow called De Asis. He told me he was the brother of a friend of mine: Leocadio de Asis. He knew me, but I didn’t know him. He had a wound in his leg. He said he was hit by a grenade. Then we heard the whizzing of shells. More shells mingled with anti-aircraft fire.

It was Corregidor. The Japs had started the offensive. “Let’s go,” said Ernie. “Let’s leave Bataan before the Rock shells this place.” So we all stood with one thought in our minds… walk and walk till we get out of Bataan. When we were all ready to start, I noticed De Asis still lying down. “What’s the matter?” I asked. “Never mind,” he said, “I can’t walk anymore. My feet are bleeding.”

It broke my heart to leave him. He tried to make it easy for us. “Go ahead,” he said, “if I were in your shoes… I’d leave you guys, too.” I looked back… when we were nearing the bend… and he was at the window… and he waved at us… and my tears just rolled down. It was every man for himself. What had war done to us?

We walked on and on. A Japanese officer met us. He was kind. He said: “Firipino, Manira; American, imprison.” We were happy. We would be free –at last. We walked on and on… with the thought that each step brought us nearer home.

Orani, Bataan

Finally, we arrived in Orani. This is the neck of the peninsula of Bataan. Here there were many Japanese guards… and we were all concentrated. We were counted, searched. Then we were brought to Balanga –five kilometers away– in a hell of a concentration camp. We were not given food nor water. The men were doing their necessities all over the place. Johnnie laid his blanket on somebody’s manure. It was a hell of a place… but they told us once again: “You will go to Manila.”

That was enough for me. I could and would endure anything as long as they brought me home where I can see mama and papa again. I think the same thought kept all of us alive. Maybe if I didn’t have a nice home… I wouldn’t have been able to walk on.

Morning came. Japanese guards woke us up with the butt of their rifles. I slept soundly. When you are tired, you can sleep anywhere, anyway… even in a mud-hole. Others who were too lazy to get up, never got up again. They were bayoneted to death. I have to give thanks that, up to then… not a single Jap ever laid hands on me. I was not robbed of a single cent, altho’ some of my companions were stripped of their watches, fountain pens and money.

Lubao, PampangaMay 6,1942

We were told to walk again. Lubao was our next destination. Nobody talked of breakfast. It was better not to think of the things you couldn’t have. It only tortured you. Our sentry was kind. He allowed us to fill our canteens with water. We were fresh again. You can’t imagine the refreshing value of water. I felt like I could wak up to Manila. But after three or four kilometers… I was already tired. A few more minutes… and I was dragging my feet. My only consolation was that all my companions were also dragging their feet.

Car after car with Japanese passengers passed by us. Some of the cars belonged to my friends. Ernie shouted: “There’s my Buick!” I asked myself: “Is this Japan’s New Order?” I couldn’t help thinking: there we were –walking, crawling; there they were: riding, smoking. Is this what they called a co-prosperity sphere?

To the right and left of me… I could see fellow soldiers gradually losing strength. Now and then, older soldiers would drop down. Too exhausted. As we approached Pampanga… my heart skipped. At last, we were nearer Manila, nearer home. But that joy lasted only for a moment. I was thirsty… but I was not allowed to drink. A captain who drank anyway was killed. Was it a crime to drink?

We walked and walked… from sunrise to sunset and then till midnight… till dawn… without food, without water. Many dropped. Others dead. Some were killed. It was the survival of the fittest. Some sentries were kind. They would permit us ten minutes rest. Sometimes twenty. They realized that even an animal… a machine… has to rest. Then I would just lie down on the cement roads of Pampanga… and fall asleep because of sheer exhaustion.

Then finally I saw Bacolor. “My hometown,” said Ernie. But the houses were filled with naked men, bald-headed men… men in G-strings. They had even taken the houses. We passed by the church. It was full of boxes, of canned goods. It was transformed into a warehouse. Many men –Filipinos– walked with Japanese flags on their breasts. Houses were flying Jap flags. I thought: only yesterday, these men were waving the American and Filipino flags.

I noticed also that the people were afraid to even greet us…. as if we didn’t go through all this hell because we wanted to fight for them. But that is the irony of life. When you win, you are cheered. But when you are defeated…

But there were also some who dared cry. I do not like tears… but somehow I was happy to see eyes that were swollen and red. But then I hoped there would be no more tears. A woman was bayoneted for crying. But could she help it? Her son was among the group.

Then… in a nipa shack… we saw the family of Ernie. His mother was crying. They gave us bread and eggs. But I was too tired. I couldn’t eat it. The Jap sentry kicked Willie Gonzales out of the way… for handing us food. Ramon asked: is it a crime to eat?

We passed by the Pasudeco. The Japs also occupied it. Ernie said: “I own part of that central… but I can’t even eat a sugarcane.”

San Fernando, Pampanga

San Fernando was in ruins. The big church in the plaza was also converted into a bodega. What was left of the houses, were occupied by Japs. We were all dumped in San Fernando’s cockpit –about 6,000 of us– jammed in that “sabungan” with a capacity for 900. You can imagine how we slept. I was half-seated, half-standing. That’s how I stayed the whole night. Here –at last– I was able to get a glass of water, thanks to Marcial Lichauco. He came over to visit us. Jorge de Leon was with him. I asked Jorge to tell Papa that I was alive and kicking.

Then I succumbed to fever. My temperature was probably around 40… but I felt like I had 50. But I was determined to carry on. In cases like this, one must steel himself and muster his fighting spirit. I could remember Papa’s lecture when I was a high school swimmer in La Salle: “Never give up. Fight to the last lap.”

Early morning, we were told to get up with kicks and butt strokes. We were made to walk to the railway station. There we were dumped in baggage cars. Imagine about 80 dirty, sickly, sweating men… locked in one of those iron baggage cars. There we were… struggling and groping for air. Many fainted. Some were moaning. Others suffocated. Some were trying to break the floors. Others said they were dying.

The train chugged on… and on… and on… Oh, why did it travel so slowly? There I was… with two mutts on my stomach… and my head cramped between Godo Reyes’ legs. But I didn’t mind… because there was a little hole… and I could get a whiff of air. I couldn’t help thinking: there are many wonderful things on earth -like the air we breathe- that we take for granted. That was the first time I realized its importance.

Capas, TarlacCapas, Tarlac, 1942

At last we arrived in Capas, Tarlac. The door of the baggage car was opened. You ought to have seen the boys breathing in the first whiff of fresh air. You would have thought that was the last time they would breathe!

We marched in fours… to O’Donnell… the concentration camp… where most of us were destined to die. There were thousands of Tarlaqueños at the station. They lined the roadside. They were crying… many of them… men, women, children. They threw bread, rice, sugar, panocha… and everything they could get a hold of. I couldn’t help crying. Every 200 meters they placed cans of water. Here was real Filipino patriotism and kindness.

The Japs couldn’t stop them. They shouted: “Heroes! Mabuhay!” Some were looking for their brothers, sons, fathers. A woman asked: “Si Mr. Julian?” When they told her… they didn’t know.. she gave out the food she prepared for him. I couldn’t hold my tears anymore. I just let them roll down my cheeks. Our fight was, after all, not in vain, I thought. At least, here were people that appreciated it. But I tried to control my tears…

Because I didn’t want my friends to see me crying. But when I dared look at them… I saw that they were also wiping their eyes. The Japanese guards then gave up the attempt to drive the people away. What they did was to help the civilians give us food. A Japanese guard handed a panocha to me… and he pointed at a pretty girl who took pity on me. For the first time, I realized the truth of Rizal’s words: “No hay verdugos donde no hay esclavos.”

We finally reached O’Donnell.

In a field… facing the headquarters of the American commander… we were made to stand at attention. I was dizzy standing there in the heat… with my fever. Many others were at the point of dropping down… we tried our best to stand straight. General [Guillermo] Francisco stood before us… and explained: “the head of this camp will talk to you. Be sure to stay at attention, or you will be shot.”

The Japanese commander arrived. He stood on the platform with an air of arrogance. He said: “I am Capt. Shineyosi. I am head of this camp. If you have no behave, you will be killed. Why you fight Japan? She is your friend. She wants to free the suffering people of Asia. The Asiatics have long been oppressed by the Whites. Now the whiles will be made to suffer…” And at this point, he made a dramatic gesture and pointed at the American prisoners on the other side of the fence.

There were the Americans, bent. They were carrying pails of water… fixing the road… building fences. They were being kicked, butt-struck, bayoneted. I saw an old American being carried by two young bearded aviators. I saw many falling down out of sheer exhaustion. I saw Japanese faces laughing at them… kicking and hitting them. I couldn’t help but pity them… although my heart was bitter at the way Americans discriminated racially against Filipinos.

These men were not entirely to blame. They were brought up in a stupid atmosphere that made them believe they were superior to the brown man. But there they were –kicked, hit by brown men. It was a picture of racial vindication… but it was also a picture of the heartlessness of war. Why should these few men… be the ones to endure the stupidities of centuries?

I was assigned to Group II and made regimental adjutant in the concentration camp. Col. Abla was our group commander. He gave us a talk: “You have to behave. Only yesterday, three boys were shot for disrespectfulness towards Japanese soldiers.”

Life in the concentration camp was quite hard. Food was scarce. All we had was a ball of rice… as big as your fist, and salt. There was hardly any water. We had to get it from the river. One could take only two cups a day… and it was boiled mud water.

There was an average of about 400 deaths a day. Many soldiers were suffering from malaria, dysentery, and deficiency diseases. The Japs, however, prohibited the Red Cross from helping the sick. If you got appendicitis, for example, it was your tough luck.

There was a hospital, but only in name. It had –to begin with– no facilities: no cotton, no medicine… and not even water. I know because I have seen that many of those who became insane in that hospital could have been saved, if they could have been given just one glass of water. I never saw such a hospital in my life. It was really a morgue… a waiting room where all the sick are piled… there to die and then to be buried.

I got sicker still in camp. Not having had a bath… for almost three weeks… I walked around with a shirt. My shirt was hard with dried sweat and I couldn’t stand my own smell. One morning… when I woke up… I noticed that I had a fever, and I was coughing. Carlos Vergel de Dios, a fellow prisoner, took care of me. He gave me a sponge bath. My fever went down. There I was lying on the floor, with wood for a pillow. I missed mama and my soft bed.

Then the next day… my fever went down to 39 degrees.

Write on Japan and the Japanese… how gradually my mind has changed… asia for the asiatics… banzai!

http://philippinediaryproject.com/1942/04/10/april-10-1942/

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ALLIANCE VEHEMENTLY CONDEMNS UNITED AIRLINES TREATMENT OF AN ASIAN DOCTOR WHO WAS THROWN OUT OF THE THE UNITED FLIGHT

ALLIANCE NEWS
April 10, 2017

ALLIANCE VEHEMENTLY CONDEMNS UNITED AIRLINES TREATMENT OF AN ASIAN DOCTOR WHO WAS THROWN OUT OF THE THE UNITED FLIGHT

Los Angeles-– The Alliance Philippines vehemently condemn the United Airline inhuman an degrading treatment of an Asian doctor who was bodily thrown out of the flight from Chicago.

He was forcibly thorn out of the plane just to accomodate United Airlines employees for the flimsy reason “that the flight was overbooked” when in truth it was not.

United Airline Racism

When nobody volunteered to take other flight, they picked the Asian doctor despite his protest that he has to attend to his patient in Louisville.

The despotism and outright racism of United Airlines is disgusting and unworthy of an airline service. United Airline flimsy excuse that no damage and the “injury of the passanger is self-inlicted” is revolting.

We call on the public to boycott United Airline for its racism and poor public service.

BOYCOT THE UNITED AIRLINES!

Alliance-Philippines
Jfav Los-Angeles

April 10, 2017

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ALLIANCE PHILIPPINES WARNS OF TRUMP WARMONGERING IN THE PACIFIC

20160402_LDD001_facebookALLIANCE NEWS
April 10, 2017

ALLIANCE PHILIPPINES WARNS OF TRUMP WARMONGERING IN THE PACIFIC

Los Angeles—First, it was Syria, now it’s the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK).

After US President Trump attacked Syria with missiles while he met with PRC’s President Xi jing Pei, he sent another naval task force into the Northern Pacific in an apparent show of force.

By sending a naval task force to the Northern Pacific against the DPRK, Trump is provoking the DPRK and brings the world into a brink of a thermo-nuclear war or another regional war in the Pacific.

DPRK Is Ready to Defend Itself.

DPRK is not a push-over. It has nuclear capabilities that is aimed at US forces in Japan and South Korea. DPRK can defend itself from US aggression. It has defeated the American aggression in the 1950’s . It is ready to defend itself again despite US military provocations.

Trump’s gambit of trying to bring the People’s Republic of China against it’s ally-the DPRK will not succeed.

The solidarity and friendship between DPRK goes back during their anti-Japanese struggle during World War II and their resist American aggression during the Korean conflict.
The PRC helped DPRK to rebuild and only left the nation when they were able to rebuild in 1961.

US Out Of Korea!

Unlike the United States that still keeps their bases and more than 30,000 American troops in South Korea and are conducting provocative military exercises, the US military presence is a proof enough to show who is the aggressor country in the Korean peninsula for the last 67 years.

The Alliance-Philippines condemns Trump’s warmongering tactics against its perceived enemies especially China in the South China seas and Northern Pacific against DPRK and Russia.

The Alliance supports the reunification of the two Korea’s and vehemently condemn the American posturing for war and intimidation in its support for japan and against Russia, China and the DPRK in Asia-Pacific.

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SIKAP (CCPS) KICKS OFF 4th PILIPINIX VISIBILITY WEEK, APRIl 9-15, 2017

FAI NEWS
April 10, 2017

SIKAP (CCPS) KICKS OFF 4th PILIPINIX VISIBILITY WEEK, APRIl 9-15, 201717883840_1445924008814937_9110453383109856924_n

Los Angeles—“ No History, No Self”

The 4th year of the PILIPINIX VISIBILTY WEEK was kicked off by SIKAP or the California Coaliton for Philippine Studies (CCPS) on 9 different campuses across Southern California from Sunday, April 9 , the 75th Bataan Day to Saturday, April 15, 2017 in California.

The PILIPINIX VISIBILITY WEEK is by fighting for our hxstory to be a requirement, not an elective. This week’s schedule to be released soon.

Participating schools are UC Irvine KABABAYAN ALLIANCE, CalPoly Pomona PASK, UCLA Samahang Pilipino, Claremont KASAMA, CSULA KALAHI, USC TROY PHI, Cal State Dominguez Hills PAGSIKAPAN, CSU Fullerton FASA and UC Santa Barbara KAPATIRANG PILIPINO.

Community groups who are supporting SKAP (CCPS) are the Alliance-Philippines, Knights of Rizal-Historic Filipintown (KOR-HFT), Justice for Filipino American Veterans JFAV) , TALAKAYAN CLUB of HFT, FACLA, Echo Park Community Coalition (EPCC). Bantay Pilipinas-USA and PILAC.

PILIPINIX VISIBILITY WEEK, April 9-15, 201717855622_1446710082069663_6756678528823996045_o

SIKAP asked all participating organizations and Filipino-American youth and students to do the following from April 9 to 15, 2017;

• Wear the SIKAP armband throughout the wekk.Reprsent that you believe in the importance of Pilipinix Studies and Ethnic Studies as wole. Visit a local campusto get yours or we will be available at the culmination ceremony.
• Join the soicalmedia campaign by taking your photo with a white board and answer the prompts.
• Use the hastags#PVW2017,#PilipinixVIsibilty week, #PilipinixVisibilty#SIKAP and #PilipinixStudiesNow

The SIKAP asked the public to SAVE THE DATE on Saturday 4/15 for their culimation ceremonies, “Resistance is Stronger: Mas Malakas ang Pakikibaka” where all schools convene at Pilipino Workers Center in Historic Filipinotown, Los Angeles from 6-8 pm.with performances, guest speakers, and more .

For more information please contact KmB/Eddy M. Gana jr at (510)386-6774 or propeople youth.

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