Daily Archives: May 9, 2016

A Tribute to Chito Tenza, A FilAm Community Leader

EPCC NEWS
May 09, 2016

A Tribute to Chito Tenza, A FilAm Community Leader

By Arturo P. Garcia

Chito Tenza

Chito Tenza was a successful Filipino American businessman from Florida. He went to Los Angeles and engaged in business. He was also a devoted Filipino American community leader in Los Angeles.

Chito did not finish his medical technology course from FEU., he switched to computers – took courses in computers He emigrated to – Los Angeles in 1971- 1972.

He returned to Manila where he did computer programs for Phillippine Navy. He was a member of Philippine Computer Society. He returned to Los Angeles, CA in 1981 as a computer analyst and consultant then established his own computer business – Synchro Systems Company

He was managing computer consulting company and was a member of the SilverLake Chamber of Commerce when drafted by Eric Garcetti to help his campaign in the Filipino-American community as a Council member of District 13 in 2001.

When Eric Garcetti was elected as Councilmember, he asked Chito Tenza to take time off and serve as his Filipino Field Deputy. District 13 included the Beverly-Temple Corridor also known as Pilipinotown or P-Town.

He was given the project to unity the Pilipinotown Project to unify the American community. Together with Jay Valencia, we worked together to push for the declaration of the Historic Filipin0town District .

Finally, after a 15 years struggle , on August 2, 2002, the City Council approved the designation of the Temple-Beverly Corridor as the Historic Filipinotwn District. A Historic Filipinotown became a reality.

He also took charge of the Filipino World War II Veterans Memorial Project in Historic Filipinotown. It was on this project he worked closely with us, the Justice For Filipino American Veterans (JFAV).

Three years after he left the District 13 office, the Filipino World War II Memorial or the Valor Monument was inaugurated on November 11, 2016, Veterans Day.

He also became the President of the Historic Filipinotown Chamber of Commerce (HFCC) organized to help the API minorities navigate doing business with the city of LA.

On October 2003, he left the District Office but he continued to work for the Filipino-American Community in Historic Filipinotown as a parishioner of St.Columban Filipino Catholic Church in Historic Filipinotown.

He peacefully passed away last May 5, 2016 in South Bay area of Los Angeles County.

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Filipino World War II Veterans Parole Policy

JFAV Updates

May 10, 2016

Filipino World War II Veterans Parole Policy

(The Justice for FIlipino American Veterans (JFAV) hereby published the article from the Federal Register, the FIlipino World War II Veterans Parole Policy due to be implemented on June 8, 2016–Editors)

SUMMARY

This notice announces the implementation of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ (USCIS) Filipino World War II Veterans Parole (FWVP) policy. Under this policy, USCIS will offer certain beneficiaries of approved family-based immigrant visa petitions an opportunity to request a discretionary grant of parole on a case-by-case basis so that they may come to the United States as they wait for their immigrant visa numbers to become available. Among other things, the policy recognizes the extraordinary contributions and sacrifices of Filipino veterans who fought for the United States during World War II. The policy also enhances the ability of such elderly veterans and their spouses to obtain care and support from their family members abroad.

I. Background of the FWVP PolicyBack to Top

More than 260,000 Filipino soldiers enlisted to fight for the United States during World War II. Estimates indicate that as many as 26,000 of these brave individuals became U.S. citizens. As U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents (LPRs), these veterans may petition for certain of their family members to come to the United States. Estimates indicate that there are approximately between 2,000 to 6,000 Filipino American World War II veterans still alive in the United States today, many of whom greatly desire to have their family members in the United States during their final days. [1]

With the exception of “immediate relatives” (i.e., parents, spouses, unmarried children under 21 years of age) of U.S. citizens, seeImmigration and Nationality Act (INA) sec. 201(b)(2)(A)(i), 8 U.S.C. 1151(b)(2)(A)(i), the number of family-sponsored immigrant visas that are available in any given year is limited by statute. See INA secs. 201(a) and (c), 202(a) and 203, 8 U.S.C. 1151(a) and (c), 1152(a) and 1153. These statutory limits have resulted in long waiting periods before family members may join the petitioning U.S. citizens or LPRs in the United States and become LPRs themselves. For certain Filipino American family members, this wait can exceed 20 years. [2]

Recognizing the contributions and sacrifices of Filipino veterans who fought for the United States during World War II and their families, USCIS has decided to implement the FWVP policy. In many cases, paroling these family members may also allow them to provide support and care for elderly veterans or their surviving spouses. Under this policy, USCIS will consider individual requests for parole submitted for certain relatives who are the beneficiaries of approved family-based immigrant visa petitions filed by Filipino veterans or their surviving spouses. [3] Where USCIS determines that exercising such discretion is appropriate, USCIS may approve parole requests for such relatives so that they may wait in the United States until they are able to adjust status under existing immigration laws. [4]

In light of the circumstances described above, among other considerations, USCIS believes that the parole of qualified applicants who establish on a case-by-case basis that they are eligible for consideration under this policy and merit a favorable exercise of discretion would generally yield a “significant public benefit.” Additionally, considering the advanced age of World War II Filipino veterans and their spouses, and their increased need for care and companionship, grants of parole under the FWVP policy would often address urgent humanitarian concerns. In all cases, whether to parole a particular individual under this policy is a discretionary determination that will be made on a case-by-case basis. Accordingly, parole applications for individuals who fall within the general criteria but whose cases present overriding adverse factors (e.g., criminal history) would not be approved.

II. Participation in the FWVP Policy and Application ProcessBack to Top

Those who may benefit from the FWVP policy are individuals: (1) who are the beneficiaries of Forms I-130, Petition for Alien Relative, including any accompanying or following-to-join spouse and children,[5] who were approved on or before the filing date of the parole request (Form I-131, Application for Travel Document); (2) whose qualifying relationship with the petitioning relative existed on or before May 9, 2016; (3) whose petitioning relative is residing in the United States (or, if deceased, was residing in the United States at the time of death); (4) whose immigrant visas are not authorized for issuance per the Application Final Action Dates chart for family-sponsored preference cases on the Department of State’s Visa Bulletin; and (5) whose petitioning relatives have established they are either Filipino World War II veterans or are the surviving spouses of such individuals.

The Filipino veteran’s qualifying World War II military service must have previously been recognized by the Department of Defense and must be described in section 405 of the Immigration Act of 1990 (IMMACT’90), [6] as amended by section 112 of Department of Justice Appropriations Act, 1998, which requires an individual to fall within one of three categories:  [7]

1. Individuals who are listed on the final roster prepared by the recovered Personnel Division of the United States Army of those who served honorably in an active duty status with the Philippine Army during the World War II occupation and liberation of the Philippines;

2. Individuals who are listed on the final roster prepared by the Guerilla Affairs Division of the United States Army of those who received recognition as having served honorably in an active duty status within a recognized guerilla unit during the World War II occupation and liberation of the Philippines; or

3. Individuals who served honorably in an active duty status within the Philippine Scouts or within any other component of the United States Armed Forces in the Far East (other than a component described in clauses 1 or 2) at any time during the period beginning September 1, 1939, and ending December 31, 1946.

USCIS will review government records to verify that the Filipino veteran’s World War II military service was recognized by the Department of Defense. When this documentation is not available, USCIS will issue a Request for Evidence to allow the petitioner to submit evidence establishing the Filipino veteran’s military service.

When the petitioning relative in the United States is the Filipino World War II veteran, individuals eligible for parole consideration could include beneficiaries under any family-sponsored preference category. Individuals who qualify as “immediate relatives” under section 201(b)(2)(A)(i) of the INA, 8 U.S.C. 1151(b)(2)(A)(i), however, will not be eligible for parole under this policy because immigrant visas for these individuals are already immediately available. Immediate relatives may seek immigrant visas for travel to the United States immediately upon the approval of immigrant visa petitions filed on their behalf. In situations where the petitioning relative in the United States is the surviving spouse of a Filipino World War II veteran, eligible individuals who may be considered for parole under this policy include only the child, son, or daughter of the surviving spouse who is also the child, son, or daughter of the Filipino World War II veteran. [8]

In cases where the petitioning relative is deceased, eligible individuals described in this paragraph may also seek parole on their own behalf, under this policy, in cases where USCIS has reinstated the approval of Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative, for humanitarian reasons. If such petition is reinstated, the self-petitioner must establish (1) a qualifying family relationship with the deceased Filipino veteran or spouse (i.e. the self-petitioner is a qualifying child, son, daughter, brother or sister of the Filipino World War II veteran); and (2) that the deceased Filipino veteran had qualifying World War II military service, as described above. Again, each of these parole requests will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis to determine whether the petitioner has met the criteria for parole and merits a favorable exercise of discretion.

Seeking parole under the FWVP policy is voluntary.

On or after June 8, 2016, an eligible U.S.-based U.S. citizen or LPR Filipino World War II veteran, or surviving spouse, with an approved Form I-130 may request parole under the FWVP policy on behalf of his or her eligible beneficiary relatives (or, if a self-applicant, on his or her own behalf). An eligible petitioner or self-applicant must file a completed Form I-131, Application for Travel Document, and a completed Form I-134, Affidavit of Support, and submit the required fee(s) or fee waiver request  [9] on behalf of each beneficiary he or she wishes to have considered for parole. The veteran, surviving spouse, or self-petitioner must provide documentation of the veteran’s qualifying World War II military service as described under section 405 of IMMACT’90, as amended. Detailed instructions on how to request parole under this policy will be included in the Instructions to Form I-131, Application for Travel Document, and on the USCIS Web site at (www.uscis.gov). USCIS will reject a Form I-131 that is not properly filed. USCIS strongly encourages individuals seeking to request parole under the FWVP policy to make such requests within 5 years from June 8, 2016 in order for their qualifying family members to be considered under this policy. Following the first four years of the implementation of this policy, USCIS will conduct additional outreach and evaluate whether the volume of actual or potential requests would support maintaining the policy, or whether it should be phased out at the end of 5 years.

USCIS or Department of State consular officers will interview all individuals considered for parole under the FWVP policy to determine whether parole is appropriate on a case-by-case basis. [10] Individuals requesting parole under this policy may also be required to have their biometrics collected. If USCIS favorably exercises its discretion to issue parole under the FWVP policy by approving the Form I-131, USCIS or the Department of State will issue the necessary travel documents to the beneficiary in the location he or she was interviewed. These travel documents generally will enable the beneficiary to travel to a U.S. port-of-entry and request parole from U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to join his or her family member. Before the beneficiary’s parole expires, the beneficiary would be required to (1) seek re-parole; (2) if eligible, apply to adjust status to that of lawful permanent resident or apply and be processed overseas for an immigrant visa; or (3) depart the United States.

If an immigrant visa becomes available to an individual who is not an “immediate relative” while a Form I-131 filed under the FWVP policy is pending, the individual will be considered for parole under this policy, if desired. Alternatively, the beneficiary can choose to pursue immigrant visa processing, which will require payment of associated fees, but will enable the individual to apply for admission to the United States as an immigrant, if found eligible by the Department of State for the immigrant visa and admissible by CBP at a U.S. port of entry.

III. Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA)Back to Top

Under the PRA, 44 U.S.C. chapter 35, all Departments are required to submit to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval, any new reporting requirements they impose. The USCIS, Application for Travel Document, (Form I-131), has been approved by OMB and assigned OMB control number 1615-0013. USCIS is only revising the Form I-131 Instructions in connection with the implementation of the FWVP policy and this notice. USCIS filed an emergency request with OMB and obtained approval of the changes to the Form I-131 Instructions. More information regarding the annual burden impact resulting from the implementation of this new policy will be provided during the next renewal cycle of the Form I-131. Currently, USCIS estimates that the FWVP policy might result in approximately 6,000 new respondents filing Form I-131s. The current OMB-approved estimated number of respondents filing Form I-131 is 940,671. USCIS believes it has overestimated the number of individuals who will use this form to apply for immigration benefits to the degree that additional respondents who will use it to file a request under the FWVP policy will be covered within the 940,671 estimated.

Additional information about the consideration of parole requests under the FWVP policy will be posted on the USCIS Web site at www.uscis.gov.

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